grapefruite

Jan 06
Permalink
Ceci n’est pas une plante.
I strongly recommend a read of Mr. Pollan’s article in the last New Yorker. It opened my eyes to how much we have to learn about plants and their network intelligence.
The Intelligent Plant. Michael Pollan, New Yorker http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2013/12/23/131223fa_fact_pollan?currentPage=1

Ceci n’est pas une plante.

I strongly recommend a read of Mr. Pollan’s article in the last New Yorker. It opened my eyes to how much we have to learn about plants and their network intelligence.

The Intelligent Plant. Michael Pollan, New Yorker http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2013/12/23/131223fa_fact_pollan?currentPage=1

Permalink
Lynn Hershman Leeson. Roberta’s Construction Chart #2. 1976. MoMA
“With a practice spanning more than forty years, Hershman Leeson has worked in performance, moving image, drawing, collage, text-based work, site-specific interventions, and later new media / digital technologies, and interactive net-based works, making her one of the first truly multi-disciplinary artists. In the pantheon of feminist artists, she also holds a special place, having investigated the question of gender, identity politics, and selfhood – a key field of interest in her practice – in-depth, over time and with a complexity that far surpasses many of her peers. This complexity is best manifested in Hershman Leeson’s seminal project The Roberta Breitmore Series (1974-1978). Nearly forty years on, the importance of The Roberta Breitmore Series cannot be over-estimated. The questions it raised about the ungraspable, fluid state of identity, about ‘truth’ and ‘authenticity’, the difficulty to often draw the line between fact and fiction, biography and autobiography, the impossibility – perhaps – of entirely achieving that ancient Greek dictum of ‘knowing thyself’, the question of how appearances deceive, and the fundamental constructedness of identity remain; perhaps now stronger than ever given the advent of the internet and the emergence of virtual identities; and of course the increased importance attached to image and self-styling in our ‘lifestyle’ conscious culture of appearances.”

Lynn Hershman Leeson. Roberta’s Construction Chart #2. 1976. MoMA

“With a practice spanning more than forty years, Hershman Leeson has worked in performance, moving image, drawing, collage, text-based work, site-specific interventions, and later new media / digital technologies, and interactive net-based works, making her one of the first truly multi-disciplinary artists. In the pantheon of feminist artists, she also holds a special place, having investigated the question of gender, identity politics, and selfhood – a key field of interest in her practice – in-depth, over time and with a complexity that far surpasses many of her peers. This complexity is best manifested in Hershman Leeson’s seminal project The Roberta Breitmore Series (1974-1978). Nearly forty years on, the importance of The Roberta Breitmore Series cannot be over-estimated. The questions it raised about the ungraspable, fluid state of identity, about ‘truth’ and ‘authenticity’, the difficulty to often draw the line between fact and fiction, biography and autobiography, the impossibility – perhaps – of entirely achieving that ancient Greek dictum of ‘knowing thyself’, the question of how appearances deceive, and the fundamental constructedness of identity remain; perhaps now stronger than ever given the advent of the internet and the emergence of virtual identities; and of course the increased importance attached to image and self-styling in our ‘lifestyle’ conscious culture of appearances.”

Nov 11
Permalink
noraleah:

Just delivered the second half of our wedding gift to @peterknox & @andreahopknox: 6 bottles of their signature wedding cocktail to enjoy in their first year of marriage. For those playing along at home, here’s the recipe: The Helen (named for Andrea’s glamorous grandmother) 1 oz Rye 1/2 oz Applejack 1/2 oz Cynar 1/2 oz Ginger Syrup 1/4 oz Cinnamon Syrup 3/4 oz Lemon Juice Shake with ice & serve in a rocks glass with ice. Cheers to true love!

I’ll never forget my Helen!

noraleah:

Just delivered the second half of our wedding gift to @peterknox & @andreahopknox: 6 bottles of their signature wedding cocktail to enjoy in their first year of marriage. For those playing along at home, here’s the recipe:
The Helen (named for Andrea’s glamorous grandmother)
1 oz Rye
1/2 oz Applejack
1/2 oz Cynar
1/2 oz Ginger Syrup
1/4 oz Cinnamon Syrup
3/4 oz Lemon Juice
Shake with ice & serve in a rocks glass with ice. Cheers to true love!

I’ll never forget my Helen!

(via peterwknox)

Sep 04
Permalink

noraleah:

This weekend Liz's little sister Becca got married to the lovely Abby and it was beautiful from top to bottom. The ceremony was at Yale Divinity School, where they met during orientation, and the reception was by a lighthouse and a carousel, with tiny gold animals as place tags. I mean adorable, right?

What an amazing wedding! Great pics Shermie.

Permalink
lareviewofbooks:

 
Evan Selinger on the role of the copycat and China’s “duplitecture” in Bianca Bosker’s Original Copies: Architectural Mimicry in Contemporary China:

Bosker boldly contends that China’s experiment in creating residential fantasylands that appropriate images and ideals from abroad may very well be a movement that creates “the most enduring monuments” to a new, post-Tiananmen Square country. Moreover, if we look past signs of obedience to the slavish logic of consumerism, she suggests we just might find the beginnings of dissent: imitation inspiring liberation.

Read the whole review here.

Sounds like a really great book.

lareviewofbooks:

 

Evan Selinger on the role of the copycat and China’s “duplitecture” in Bianca Bosker’s Original Copies: Architectural Mimicry in Contemporary China:

Bosker boldly contends that China’s experiment in creating residential fantasylands that appropriate images and ideals from abroad may very well be a movement that creates “the most enduring monuments” to a new, post-Tiananmen Square country. Moreover, if we look past signs of obedience to the slavish logic of consumerism, she suggests we just might find the beginnings of dissent: imitation inspiring liberation.

Read the whole review here.

Sounds like a really great book.

(Source: lareviewofbooks)

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photomelissa:

Pretty sky, pretty city.

New York City! Beautiful!!

photomelissa:

Pretty sky, pretty city.

New York City! Beautiful!!

Permalink
fuckyeahbrutalism:

French Primary School, Geneva, Switzerland, 1962
(Candilis, Josic, Woods with Arthur Bugna)

Hmmm. Switzerland. I want to go to there.

fuckyeahbrutalism:

French Primary School, Geneva, Switzerland, 1962

(Candilis, Josic, Woods with Arthur Bugna)

Hmmm. Switzerland. I want to go to there.

Permalink

fastcompany:

New York Daily News' Marc A. Hermann matched old newspaper photographs of crimes and accidents with present-day locations to create riveting photo mashups of NYC’s past and present

interesting

(via peterwknox)

Jul 24
Permalink
peterwknox:

Last night Andrea took me to a 10:30 immersive-theater experience of Then She Fell deep in Brooklyn. To accommodate a maximum of only 15 theatergoers/participants there’s two shows a night; one at 7:30 and one at 10:30. I thought I’d be tired, but that concern disappeared as I entered the re-imagined Greenpoint Hospital between 10:10 & 10:29pm (there’s no getting in outside that window) and it certainly didn’t feel like 12:39am when I left the building following the interactive performance.
What I love about theater is that it’s a completely unique and one-of-a-kind performance every time you see it. Sports are like that, or they were before every second was recorded and photographed and available 24/7 in highlight packages on your phone.
Just like no two sporting matches can ever be the same, each time a show is performed it exists only in that moment and then is gone forever, unlike a book that will always contain those same words or a movie that always shows the exact same scenes.
But what sets apart traditional theater and this new trend of participatory (or ‘interactive’) theater is precisely what used to make theater a performance - a stage in front of an audience. When that fourth wall is broken down and you’re led by the hand of a stranger/paid actor down a hallway and told to sit in a chair until another paid actor comes and gets you, it feels far more real than any theater you’ve seen before. You become an actor in their world.

So for two hours I was led around this wonderland-like dreamscape crafted around Lewis Carroll and his ambiguous relationship with Alice Liddell, the little girl for whom he created Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and an unknown incidence that separated them, leading to his darker follow-up Through the Looking Glass. I knew nothing of this context beforehand and now I’m endlessly fascinated by it.
You would be too after this. Whereas Sleep No More was an epic multi-level free-range sandbox experience (ie. Grand Theft Auto-style of play), Then She Fell is a tightly controlled journey through various rooms, set pieces, mini-performances, monologues, interactions, where I was guided by actors I had to trust (ie. Gear of War).
And while Sleep No More had me running around frantically trying to balance exploring the rooms, chasing the action, and a constant fear-of-missing-out (did you see the bloody naked minotaur disco?), Then She Fell gave me the opposite feeling - these decisions were already made for me, I trusted my guides completely, and I was open to the experiences fate created for me.

I can’t say it’s a spoiler to share that I was given alcoholic cocktails composed from bottles hidden in books, played through a game of chess, made to watch interactions on the other side of a two-way mirror, wrote letters, read letters, told stories as I lay on a bed, painted, observed, had conversations, and enjoyed a tea party drinking a concoction I ordered a la carte.
These aren’t spoilers because Andrea’s experiences and scenes were completely different. What was repeated and rotated amongst the 15 participants and wasn’t would require a few more visits myself. Sometimes I was in a room with Andrea and another person, but more often I was separated from that trio and left in a room with an actor performing only for me. Those experiences I can promise will never be repeated for anyone, as they played off my interaction with the actor one on one.
One such scene that will stay with me forever was when I was made to question everything about the show. There are only two rules: Only speak when spoken to & Don’t open closed doors. In this case I was sitting outside a halfway-closed door observing the actress inside the room, having been told to sit there until told otherwise.
She “noticed” me watching her, turned and pulled the door closer to being closed so I could no longer see inside. Then she asked me: “Is it better to do what you want or do what you’re told?" I sat there, remembering that even though I had been told to sit there until told otherwise, I was allowed to speak when spoken to and that door wasn’t completely closed.
I answered and we talked, the cracked door remaining ajar between us, but that question, with it’s many meta-levels of context and conduct, still sits there beating loudly in my chest, Is it better to do what you want or what you’re told?

What a wild experience! Wonderful choreography used all surfaces of the incredible sets/rooms- walls, tables, stairs, ceilings, the top of cabinets. The Mad Hatter was incredible and I loved chasing the White Rabbit.

peterwknox:

Last night Andrea took me to a 10:30 immersive-theater experience of Then She Fell deep in Brooklyn. To accommodate a maximum of only 15 theatergoers/participants there’s two shows a night; one at 7:30 and one at 10:30. I thought I’d be tired, but that concern disappeared as I entered the re-imagined Greenpoint Hospital between 10:10 & 10:29pm (there’s no getting in outside that window) and it certainly didn’t feel like 12:39am when I left the building following the interactive performance.

What I love about theater is that it’s a completely unique and one-of-a-kind performance every time you see it. Sports are like that, or they were before every second was recorded and photographed and available 24/7 in highlight packages on your phone.

Just like no two sporting matches can ever be the same, each time a show is performed it exists only in that moment and then is gone forever, unlike a book that will always contain those same words or a movie that always shows the exact same scenes.

But what sets apart traditional theater and this new trend of participatory (or ‘interactive’) theater is precisely what used to make theater a performance - a stage in front of an audience. When that fourth wall is broken down and you’re led by the hand of a stranger/paid actor down a hallway and told to sit in a chair until another paid actor comes and gets you, it feels far more real than any theater you’ve seen before. You become an actor in their world.

So for two hours I was led around this wonderland-like dreamscape crafted around Lewis Carroll and his ambiguous relationship with Alice Liddell, the little girl for whom he created Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and an unknown incidence that separated them, leading to his darker follow-up Through the Looking Glass. I knew nothing of this context beforehand and now I’m endlessly fascinated by it.

You would be too after this. Whereas Sleep No More was an epic multi-level free-range sandbox experience (ie. Grand Theft Auto-style of play), Then She Fell is a tightly controlled journey through various rooms, set pieces, mini-performances, monologues, interactions, where I was guided by actors I had to trust (ie. Gear of War).

And while Sleep No More had me running around frantically trying to balance exploring the rooms, chasing the action, and a constant fear-of-missing-out (did you see the bloody naked minotaur disco?), Then She Fell gave me the opposite feeling - these decisions were already made for me, I trusted my guides completely, and I was open to the experiences fate created for me.

I can’t say it’s a spoiler to share that I was given alcoholic cocktails composed from bottles hidden in books, played through a game of chess, made to watch interactions on the other side of a two-way mirror, wrote letters, read letters, told stories as I lay on a bed, painted, observed, had conversations, and enjoyed a tea party drinking a concoction I ordered a la carte.

These aren’t spoilers because Andrea’s experiences and scenes were completely different. What was repeated and rotated amongst the 15 participants and wasn’t would require a few more visits myself. Sometimes I was in a room with Andrea and another person, but more often I was separated from that trio and left in a room with an actor performing only for me. Those experiences I can promise will never be repeated for anyone, as they played off my interaction with the actor one on one.

One such scene that will stay with me forever was when I was made to question everything about the show. There are only two rules: Only speak when spoken to & Don’t open closed doors. In this case I was sitting outside a halfway-closed door observing the actress inside the room, having been told to sit there until told otherwise.

She “noticed” me watching her, turned and pulled the door closer to being closed so I could no longer see inside. Then she asked me: “Is it better to do what you want or do what you’re told?" I sat there, remembering that even though I had been told to sit there until told otherwise, I was allowed to speak when spoken to and that door wasn’t completely closed.

I answered and we talked, the cracked door remaining ajar between us, but that question, with it’s many meta-levels of context and conduct, still sits there beating loudly in my chest, Is it better to do what you want or what you’re told?

What a wild experience! Wonderful choreography used all surfaces of the incredible sets/rooms- walls, tables, stairs, ceilings, the top of cabinets. The Mad Hatter was incredible and I loved chasing the White Rabbit.

Permalink

noraleah:

Lots of cool stuff on display at PSGK’s Future of Home Living exhibit, which opened yesterday in NYC.

Hey Andrea, wanna be my date?

Let’s go!!